Issue 56 | August 2, 2013 | Is College Worth It?

Newsletters Archive

Greetings!

 

Many moms have asked, but few have offered solutions to this question: How does a home schooling mom motivate her high school son to produce work that matches his potential?  

If you have a story to share on how you found a way to get the best from your male student, we would love to hear from you.  Please address your stories toathome@narhs.org.  We will publish them in the next newsletter scheduled for August 16.  

INSIDE NARHS: School Year Ending!

INSIDE NARHS:

The academic year ends on August 31.  All work that has been completed between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013 must be reported in a portfolio review by October 31, to avoid a late fee.  If you have any questions regarding the organization of your portfolio, please contact your advisor.

Katie Meinzinger     kmeizinger@narhs.org            509 426 1195

Wendi Frank           wfrank@narhs.org                  800 882 2828 Tues & Fri

Rebecca Whitmore  whitmore@cabinriver.com       800 882 2828 Mon & Wed

Maureen Martin        mmartin@narhs.org               207 778 3545

 
Featured this week: Is college worth it?

Have you ever wondered if college is a good investment?  This might make you wonder: "With more than 18 million current undergraduates who pay an average annual tuition of $32,000 each, the market for higher education seems to be going gangbusters."  (Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, "The Jobs of the Future Do not Require a College Degree",Forbes, 5/07/2013).    In case other options might seem somewhat interesting, read the list of the fastest growing occupations compiled by the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

Fastest growing occupations

 

This table also can be found in the article, "Occupational Employment Projections to 2020," published in the January 2012 Monthly Labor Review.

 

Table 1.3: Fastest growing occupations, 2010 and projected 2020  (Numbers in thousands)

2010 National Employment 

Employment

Change, 2010

Median annual wage

2010

2020

Number

Percent

 

Total, All Occupations

143,068.1

163,537.1

20,468.9

14.3

$33,840

 

Personal Care Aides

861.0

1,468.0

607.0

70.5

19,640

 

Home Health Aides

1,017.7

1,723.9

706.3

69.4

20,560

 

Biomedical Engineers

15.7

25.4

9.7

61.7

81,540

 

Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters

29.4

47.0

17.6

60.1

27,780

 

Helpers--Carpenters

46.5

72.4

25.9

55.7

25,760

 

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

80.2

121.9

41.7

52.0

29,710

 

Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers

19.1

28.4

9.3

48.6

38,430

 

Physical Therapist Assistants

67.4

98.2

30.8

45.7

49,690

 

Helpers--Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters

57.9

84.2

26.3

45.4

26,740

 

Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners

71.6

102.9

31.3

43.7

45,260

 

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers

53.7

77.1

23.4

43.5

64,380

 

Occupational Therapy Assistants

28.5

40.8

12.3

43.3

51,010

 

Physical Therapist Aides

47.0

67.3

20.3

43.1

23,680

 

Glaziers

41.9

59.6

17.7

42.4

36,640

 

Interpreters and Translators

58.4

83.1

24.6

42.2

43,300

 

Medical Secretaries

508.7

718.9

210.2

41.3

30,530

 

Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

282.7

399.3

116.6

41.2

60,570

 

Marriage and Family Therapists

36.0

50.8

14.8

41.2

45,720

 

Brickmasons and Blockmasons

89.2

125.3

36.1

40.5

46,930

 

Physical Therapists

198.6

276.0

77.4

39.0

76,310

 

Dental Hygienists

181.8

250.3

68.5

37.7

68,250

 

Bicycle Repairers

9.9

13.6

3.7

37.6

23,660

 

Audiologists

13.0

17.8

4.8

36.8

66,660

 

Health Educators

63.4

86.6

23.2

36.5

45,830

 

Stonemasons

15.6

21.4

5.7

36.5

37,180

 

Cost Estimators

185.4

252.9

67.5

36.4

57,860

 

Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists

100.0

136.5

36.4

36.4

76,700

 

Mental Health Counselors

120.3

163.9

43.6

36.3

38,150

 

Pile-Driver Operators

4.1

5.6

1.5

36.0

47,860

 

Veterinarians

61.4

83.4

22.0

35.9

82,040

Source: Employment Projections program, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics